MARGARET JUHAE LEE

STARRY FIELD

A MEMOIR OF LOST HISTORY
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Margaret Juhae Lee is seeking representation for Starry Field: A Memoir of Lost History, which chronicles her search for information on her grandfather who was a student revolutionary in colonial Korea. She received a Bunting Fellowship from Harvard University and a Korea Studies Fellowship from the Korea Foundation in support of research for her book.

Margaret is a contributor to Oakland Magazine and also works as a communication consultant. Previously, she was an editor for the Books and the Arts section at The Nation magazine. She has written articles and reviews for The Nation, Newsday, Elle, ARTnews, the Progressive, and VIA, among other publications.

She is a second-generation Korean-American and lives in Oakland with her husband and two sporty children.

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EXPLORE STARRY FIELD

Starry Field: A Memoir of Lost History is a personal account of Margaret Juhae Lee’s family history through three generations. It tells the story of her grandfather, a student revolutionary who was imprisoned for protesting Japanese rule in colonial Korea. The details of his life were seemingly lost during the Korean War, when his wife burned all of his papers in order to escape political persecution. Lee, his American-born granddaughter, never learned of the Korean side of her heritage until adulthood.

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"You will be buried again today, over fifty years after you were buried the first time, when your father watched as the remains of his 27-year-old son were laid to rest in a mountain site he had reserved for himself. "
Excerpt from Starry Field.
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family

MEET THE FAMILY

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Lee Chul Ha

Grandfather

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Kum Soon Min

Grandmother + Father

Dad_Brother

Eun Sul Lee + Eun Suk Lee

Father + Uncle

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Chong Mahn Lee

Mother

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Eun Sul Lee

Father

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Margaret Juhae Lee

Daughter

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"Best of all, she has her own bedroom that she doesn’t have to share with anyone. She can read her Bible there as much as she wants. And the ultimate luxury, an extra room to house an errant relative who has hit on difficult times, an occasional boarder or even to keep empty.

She can decide."

Excerpt from Starry Field
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SELECTED OTHER WRITINGS

OAKLAND MAGAZINE

Maika Makes Bags for the Rest of Us

Oakland Momtrepreneurs Are Behind Kids’ Brand Mightly

Grow Your Own Kitchen Garden with Orta Seed Pots

Tiny Splendor ‘Zines

Pilates, It’s Not What You Think

 

THE NATION

Seoul’s Celluloid Soul: Korea’s Local Film Quota Has Hollywood Hopping Mad, (Anthologized in Readings in Mass Communications: Media Literacy and Culture by Kimberley Massey, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, Second edition, 2001.)

Remains of the Day, Review of A Gesture Life by Chang-rae Lee

Korea’s Fallout, Review of Ten Thousand Sorrows: The Extraordinary Journey of a Korean War Orphan by Elizabeth Kim

 

THE ADVOCATE

South Korea: A Public and Painful Coming-Out

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CONTACT MARGARET